Διεθνή Media

Play shines light on Trojan Horse 'Islamist plot' to run schools

the guardian - 4 hours 14 min ago

Much-disputed events centring on Birmingham schools is subject of ambitious drama

The notorious Trojan Horse inquiry into an alleged Islamist takeover of a number of inner city schools in the east of Birmingham is the subject of a documentary play that explores the devastating impact of the affair on the city and those whose lives it touched.

Based on more than 200 hours of interviews with about 90 witnesses, including many of the teachers, pupils, parents and governors whose lives were turned upside down by the events four years ago, the play will have its premiere in Edinburgh next month.

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Teen mums: 'We're not all reckless and careless'

bbc education - 9 hours 45 min ago
Young people have been called "generation sensible" as they shun sex and drugs for family time. But how do teen mums feel about the phrase?
Categories: Διεθνή Media

Homeless but working families rise by 73%, says Shelter

bbc education - 10 hours 39 min ago
There's been a dramatic rise in the number of families who work but are still homeless, says charity.
Categories: Διεθνή Media

Holiday childcare

bbc education - 11 hours 7 min ago
Entertaining kids during the holidays is expensive, but some have found innovative ways to cut the cost.
Categories: Διεθνή Media

The Guardian view on school funding: cash is needed but so is a change of direction | Editorial

the guardian - Sun, 22/07/2018 - 20:44
Education secretary Damian Hinds is right that teachers need a pay rise, but wrong to proceed with grammar school expansion

Since 2009, school spending per pupil in England has fallen by about 8% in real terms, with a smaller fall in Wales of about 5%. While total school spending has risen in England by about 1% in real terms over this period, a 10% rise in pupil numbers means that slightly increased resources are now more thinly spread. In Wales, spending has fallen by around 5% but because pupil numbers there have remained constant, it is English schools that have experienced the more severe cuts. Since spending per pupil in Wales was lower before 2009, the cuts have evened things out.

These are the facts about the current position. That they are not more widely known is partly because the amount of money going to schools for pupils under 16 was protected until 2015. Only by taking into account large reductions in spending on sixth forms, and by local authorities, was the independent Institute of Fiscal Studies able to present a more complete picture of the budget pressures faced by schools, in a report this month.

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Even Rudyard Kipling felt iffy about If | Letters

the guardian - Sun, 22/07/2018 - 20:41
Thoughts from John Anzani, Richard Maidment and Mike Wright following the decision to erase Rudyard Kipling’s poem, If, from a display at the University of Manchester

I feel that some correspondents are missing a key point regarding the replacement of a poem by Kipling with one by Maya Angelou in the students’ union building at the University of Manchester (Letters, 21 July). This took place as part of the extensive and continuing refurbishment programme of the building being undertaken this summer. It is not the removal of some long-standing artwork on a university building. 

It is entirely appropriate that the executive of the students’ union should decide whether or not the proposed text is suitable for display in the union building, and to take note of protests by the membership. I note that the executive accept that they were not as familiar with all the details of the proposed decorative aspects of the project as they should have been. In due course they will be held accountable both for that and the decision itself by the membership through the democratic structures, as they will be for all other aspects of the refurbishment. As a life member of the union I support their decision to install the text by Maya Angelou.
John Anzani
Musselburgh, East Lothian

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Studium: Mühsamer Tanz auf zwei Hochzeiten

sueddeutsche_bild - Sun, 22/07/2018 - 19:54

Ein duales oder berufsbegleitendes Studium wird immer beliebter. Doch die Doppelbelastung stresst viele.

Categories: Διεθνή Media

Schulen: Der kühle Blick

sueddeutsche_bild - Sun, 22/07/2018 - 19:54

Hamburgs Schulsystem war lange ein Sorgenkind, seit einigen Jahren aber geht es steil bergauf. Das hat viel mit Bildungssenator Ties Rabe zu tun - und seinem Glauben an die Macht der Daten.

Categories: Διεθνή Media

Broadford Primary School has SATs results annulled

bbc education - Sun, 22/07/2018 - 19:49
It concerns allegations of cheating at Broadford Primary School, in Romford, east London.
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The great academy schools scandal

the guardian - Sun, 22/07/2018 - 11:30
They were hailed as education’s great leap forward. But across England, the trusts that run them are failing

Kinsley Academy may officially be less than three years old, but its redbrick buildings stand as a reminder that there has been a primary school here, serving this rural, former mining community in West Yorkshire, for well over 100 years. Jade Garfitt didn’t hesitate to send her son, aged five, to the school: Kinsley born and bred, she felt she’d got an excellent education there herself.

But since he started she has become increasingly concerned. “He’s received one piece of homework this academic year,” she tells me over a cup of tea in the community cafe across the road. “He’s only done PE once since November. At one point, his class went two weeks without having their reading books changed. If you tried to say, ‘Look, there’s issues here’, you’d be shooed away.”

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Posh Boys: How the English Public Schools Ruin Britain – review

the guardian - Sun, 22/07/2018 - 11:00
Robert Verkaik comprehensively illustrates the stranglehold the public school system still has on Britain

Robert Verkaik could hardly have picked a better time to publish this. One notorious posh boy (Eton, Oxford) exits Her Majesty’s Foreign and Commonwealth Office, another (Charterhouse, Oxford) arrives to take over. No surprise there, but the nation, or the 93% of it that did not go to private school, is left wondering again how this crony class of bought privilege and vicious self-interest has managed to hold on to the reins for so long. Not least when – from Balaclava to Brexit – they haven’t run things very well.

Of course, it may be that the grockles and plebs are not very bothered. In his fascinating, enraging polemic, Verkaik touches on one of the strangest aspects of the elite schools and their product’s domination of public life for two and a half centuries: the acquiescence of everyone else. “Public schools have a mesmerising influence over British people,” Verkaik says, echoing George Orwell (Eton) 85 years ago. Verkaik says we are all seduced, not least by the innocent question: “Who doesn’t want the best for their children?” As a parent and a troubled posh boy myself, I understand him.

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A breakfast club is make or break for too many working parents | Barbara Ellen

the guardian - Sun, 22/07/2018 - 08:00
Pictures of parents queuing from 3am for a scarce place brought back worrying memories of my own struggles

Has adequate childcare become an unaffordable luxury in Britain?

More than 100 parents queued outside the Ysgol Y Berllan Deg primary school in Cardiff from 3am last week to secure a free breakfast club place for their children. Places were limited, and allocated on a first come, first served basis. So the parents queued outside, sitting on camping chairs from the early hours. It was reminiscent of when people used to queue outside department stores for big sales items – the massive telly or the leatherette three-piece suite.

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A quick note to say… thank you to my tough old schoolmaster

the guardian - Sun, 22/07/2018 - 07:59

Gordon Fermer, a retired accountant, 79, says his old teacher pushed him and made him study

Gabby Lower was infamous at my secondary school: he had a bamboo cane, and he certainly used it. I remember him once asking everyone to hold out their hands and those with dirty fingernails got their hands caned. Another time he asked us to put the words ‘their’ and ‘there’ in the right context, and those who didn’t get it right were caned. He was very strict: he’d say to us, you’re going to do what I want you to do.

But as well as being strict, he was fair. Of course, his methods would be heavily and rightly criticised today, but here’s the point: Gabby Lower was the first person who really made me work. I’d never got down to studying before. I was very into sport, but had never done much in the classroom – and having him as my form teacher changed everything.

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'I was trapped in my mind for a decade, now I'm going to be a dad'

bbc education - Sun, 22/07/2018 - 02:35
Martin Pistorius had locked-in syndrome for more than a decade. Now he's about to become a father.
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There Is Life After Campus Infamy

NYTimes - Sat, 21/07/2018 - 13:00
How five people recovered — or vanished — after intense scrutiny at an early age.
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Richard Ovenden, Bodley’s librarian: ‘I don’t want to screw it up. That's on my mind’

the guardian - Sat, 21/07/2018 - 10:00

The author and Oxford fellow on the joys of the city’s Covered Market, the importance of tea and debating with his daughter

I go to sleep quickly. I need a minimum of six hours and I like to be in bed by 11pm. I often wake up in the night, so I’ll go downstairs to get a book – anything from Zadie Smith to John le Carré – to read. I’m awake when the alarm goes off at 6.25am. My wife is an artist, so she has a different routine; in the morning, we converse amicably, but briefly!

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Categories: Διεθνή Media

Richard Ovenden, Bodley’s librarian: ‘I feel a huge responsibility. I don’t want to screw it up’

the guardian - Sat, 21/07/2018 - 09:00

The author and Oxford fellow on the joys of the city’s Covered Market, the importance of tea and debating with his daughter

I go to sleep quickly. I need a minimum of six hours and I like to be in bed by 11pm. I often wake up in the night, so I’ll go downstairs to get a book – anything from Zadie Smith to John le Carré – to read. I’m awake when the alarm goes off at 6.25am. My wife is an artist, so she has a different routine; in the morning, we converse amicably, but briefly!

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Student holiday jobs: it’s pay tax now and reclaim later, after rules change

the guardian - Sat, 21/07/2018 - 09:00
Special tax-free status has ended - now temporary staff will be taxed like any other worker

Students taking short-term holiday jobs this summer face paying income tax and national insurance after a little-known change in the tax rules a few years ago, accountants have warned.

Those starting temporary jobs as waiters, bar staff, cleaners and fruit pickers in the coming days face being taxed as any other worker if they earn more than £987 in a single month, tax advisers Blick Rothenberg said this week.

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Hinds pledges to help teachers overwhelmed by excessive workload

the guardian - Fri, 20/07/2018 - 20:14

Education secretary pledges to do more to tackle stress that is driving qualified staff away

The education secretary, Damian Hinds, has admitted that too many teachers in England are being overwhelmed by excessive workload and has pledged to do more to relieve the causes of stress that have been pushing qualified staff out of the classroom.

The move came as Hinds argued that schools are on a par with the NHS as a “special case” for extra government spending, as behind the scenes negotiations over funding continue to delay any announcement on a pay rise for teachers.

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We can’t paint over our racist past | Letters

the guardian - Fri, 20/07/2018 - 19:27
Manchester university students defacing a Kipling poem draws mixed responses from readers

I read the article about how at the University of Manchester the students painted over the Kipling mural and replaced it with a Maya Angelou poem (Report, 20 July). How disappointing. It seems England is following the same path as the US where our 19th- and early 20th-century racist past is concerned. We cannot go back and undo what was done but we can learn from them. Whitewashing the past, pretending it did not happen is not how we learn.

In the US we are also selective in what monuments etc we tear down. Statues of Robert E Lee and other southerners must be torn down immediately, but the golden statue of a northern general in New York’s Central Park must not be touched, even though William T Sherman turned to the same scorched-earth policies against the Native Americans after the civil war in one of our most shameful periods of racism. Then I ask the question why Maya Angelou? Was there not an English poet who would better represent England, or maybe an Indian poet from the same generation as Kipling?
Sonia Romaih
San Diego, California, USA

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